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Elevator repairman dies after being fatally injured at work

On Behalf of | Feb 8, 2016 | Workplace Accidents |

There are numerous areas on every construction site that have to be assessed for safety hazards prior to the commencement of operations. This is an enormous responsibility on the shoulders of any construction company owner in Colorado or another state. Neglecting hazard assessments can lead to employees being injured at work, and in some cases workplace injuries can be fatal.

The death of a worker in the elevator shaft of a building under construction in another state is being investigated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. At first, it was reported that the worker had fallen seven stories in the elevator shaft of the high-rise apartment building. However, the county prosecutor’s office  subsequently indicated that, instead of falling down the shaft, the man was actually trapped between the door of the elevator and the roof of the car, and he was dragged upward for seven stories.

The incident apparently occurred at about 7:30 a.m. on a recent Tuesday, and the worker was declared dead at the accident scene. An OSHA spokesperson said the man was a repairman employed by Schindler Enterprises, Inc. — a well-known escalator and elevator manufacturing company. Investigators of OSHA and the prosecutor’s office are working to determine the cause of the accident. OSHA will also focus on compliance with safety regulations by the construction company and the elevator company.

The surviving family of someone who was fatally injured at work may have to face numerous financial stumbling blocks following such a tragedy. As in other states, Colorado workers are covered through workers’ compensation insurance. The dependents of a deceased victim of a workplace accident may pursue death benefits claims through the insurance program to cover the costs of a funeral and burial, as well as living expenses for a predetermined period after the death.

Source: nj.com, “OSHA investigating deceased elevator worker’s 7-story fall”, Laura Herzog, Feb. 2, 2016

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