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September 2017 Archives

Cleaners face higher risks for lung and heart disease

At first glance, custodial work may appear to be a low-stress and laid-back occupation. Many cleaners find that the work is not overly demanding in physical terms - it just requires diligence and thoroughness. Custodial work performed in office buildings is rarely dangerous. Often, cleaners work in the evening after other workers have gone home and many cleaners work with minimal supervision.

Pressure washer injuries can be serious and even fatal

Even the most basic of power tools can pose serious hazards. Look at the pressure washer for example, used to clean things such as building exteriors, paved surfaces, commercial vehicles, and farm equipment. It's far more than just a souped up garden hose. An electrically-powered industrial grade pressure washer sprays water at pressures at 1,000 pounds per square inch or more. A gas-powered pressure washer can spray water at pressures ranging from 2,000 to 4,000 pounds per square inch.

Injured at work: Heat exposure dangerous even after June

The Bureau of Labor Statistics recently issued a reminder that employers nationwide, including in Colorado, should not lose sight of the hazards of environmental heat exposure even though summer is winding down. Heat illness can occur at any time, and of all reports about employees being injured at work during this time, a significant percentage involved heat exposure. The same goes for on-the-job fatalities.

Be careful -- cold stress can lead to permanent disability

Winter will soon be here in full force, and Colorado workers in some occupations will be susceptible to a variety of seasonal injuries called "cold stress." Affected employees can be any of those whose occupations keep them exposed to cold weather. These include outdoor construction workers, sanitation employees, law enforcement officers, snow removal workers, emergency medical technicians, firefighters and more. Without proper precautions, cold stress can cause severe bodily harm -- in fact, it could even cause permanent disability or death.

Hazards of manual fluid sampling in oil fields

Fluid sampling and gauging are routine tasks in oil production fields across the nation. Unfortunately for oil workers, these tasks can be very hazardous. Between 2010 and 2014, nine deaths in oil fields occurred due to exposure to hydrocarbon gas and lack of oxygen during the fluid sampling or gauging process, including one death in Colorado. When the concentration of hydrocarbon gas is sufficiently high, a spark or open flame can set off an explosion.

Family of deceased refinery worker may seek death benefits

Refinery workers in Colorado and other states face multiple hazards in the line of duty. Within the blink of an eye, a deadly situation can develop. One such an incident claimed the life of a worker in a neighboring state on a recent Monday. Such tragedies typically lead to death benefits claims filed with the workers' compensation insurance program.

Myths about patient handling techniques

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), health care workers (nurses, nursing aides, orderlies, and attendants) suffer musculoskeletal injuries at a rate seven times that of workers in other occupations. This is far higher than workers in other physically demanding industries such as construction, mining, and warehousing. Health care employers incur $20 billion in direct and indirect costs related to musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace.

To protect your health, avoid toluene exposure

Toluene is a highly useful chemical found in a number of industrial and consumer products, including paints, metal cleaners, adhesives, nail polish, and printing inks. Toluene vaporizes when exposed to air at room temperature. That can result in serious health problems for workers who inhale even small amounts of toluene on a regular basis. Toluene is also highly volatile and when the atmospheric concentration is high enough, even a distant flame or nearby static charge can spark a flashback explosion.

Use of vibrating tools can lead to Raynaud's disease

That tingling feeling in your fingers or hands may indicate a serious problem. Repeated use of jack hammers, drills, sanders, lawn mowers, and other vibrating tools can damage small blood vessels in the hands and fingers, reducing blood flow. When the affected hands and fingers are subsequently exposed to cold, a person can experience pain, numbness, tingling, and throbbing. This condition goes under a variety of names, including white finger, Raynaud's disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, and Raynaud's syndrome.

Permanent disability: Worker's arm ripped off by conveyor system

According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, there are four categories of workplace accidents that cause most workplace fatalities, one of which is getting trapped in or between objects or equipment. While many lives are lost in these types of accidents, a survivor may find him or herself with a permanent disability. One such an accident tore off the arm of a Colorado man on a recent Wednesday morning.

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Eley Law Firm
2000 S. Colorado Blvd. No. 2-740
Denver, CO 80222

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