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What to know about PTSD and workers’ comp

On Behalf of | Oct 19, 2021 | Workers' Compensation |

PTSD is a mental health disorder that can occur after someone experienced or witnessed an event that threatened their life in Colorado. This may have happened while doing your job, which means that you may be wondering whether you’re entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. If that’s so, here’s what you need to know.

How can PTSD occur on the job?

There are many ways in which PTSD can occur on the job. For example, someone who works as a police officer may get involved in an attack or shooting that results in PTSD symptoms. Similarly, paramedics and firefighters could also experience these same symptoms if they’re exposed to traumatic events at work frequently.

Are you entitled to workers’ compensation benefits?

You may receive workers’ compensation if you got injured on the job or experienced a work-related accident that led to PTSD. However, there are certain situations where your PTSD is not considered service-connected and therefore does not qualify for workers’ comp benefits, such as if you got exposed to the trauma before entering the workforce.

Your mental health disorder has to be clearly connected with your job in order for it to qualify.

How does workers’ compensation work?

If your PTSD is service-connected, you should receive benefits. You may receive both medical and financial coverage that will help cover the cost of your treatment and pay for things, like transportation, child care or home health services. Benefits also include reimbursement for some expenses related to recovery and lost wages if you need time away from work.

If your PTSD is not considered service-connected, you may still qualify for benefits if you suffer another on-the-job injury that causes further impairment. For example, if an injury to your arm prevents you from working, and it also makes it difficult to take care of yourself at home due to extreme anxiety or depression, then this second issue may qualify for benefits.

PTSD can be a very debilitating disorder, not just emotionally but financially as well. In summary, you may get compensated for PTSD if your mental health issue is service-connected or related to another on-the-job injury.

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