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Denver Workers' Compensation Blog

Are part-time workers covered by workers' compensation?

During the holiday season, hundreds of stores throughout Colorado hire part-time workers. Many of those hired take these jobs to gain some extra cash, with the full understanding that their period of employment will be temporary.

But these workers must learn their job duties very quickly. Often, they are put out on the retail floor or in the stockroom with little or no training. And inexperienced or under-trained employees are more vulnerable to workplace injuries than full-time experienced workers.

Construction zone worker critically injured at work

Workers who build and repair the roads of Colorado put their lives on the line with every shift they work. Too many construction zone workers have been injured at work because of negligent drivers who pass the zones without caution. On a recent Tuesday morning, a construction worker was critically injured in Thornton.

According to the Thornton Police Department, the incident occurred shortly after 11 a.m. when the driver of a sedan lost control of his or her vehicle. Reportedly, this happened while the car was traveling down the exit ramp. The reason for this loss of control is yet to be determined.

Lack of sleep is as dangerous as intoxication

According to a new study, not getting enough sleep can result in impaired memory and visual perception. The authors of the study likened the effects of sleep deprivation to those of intoxication. This implies that that driving , operating machinery, or using power tools without enough sleep can be as dangerous as performing those activities while under the influence of alcohol.

Death benefits may be available for family of deceased worker

Maintenance workers in Colorado and other states face many different safety hazards as they go about their duties. The same goes for similarly employed people elsewhere, as was reported by a recreation center in a neighboring state. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration said that the agency is investigating an accident that led to the death of a maintenance worker. The incident may result in a workers' compensation claim for death benefits.

The incident apparently occurred on an afternoon in September. Reportedly, the man was in a scissor lift that was elevated to allow work on the basketball backboard assembly in the gymnasium. It is suspected that the lift struck the backboard and tipped over to the side. Although it had the required guardrails to prevent falls, the worker suffered critical head trauma.

Should you agree to a functional capacity evaluation?

If you are a workers' compensation claimant who is reaching the point of maximum medical improvement, the insurance company may ask you to submit to a functional capacity evaluation (FCE). An FCE is a series of tests that measure a person's physical capacities and functional abilities.

Determining whether to submit to an FCE is a very important decision. The results of the evaluation could affect your disability rating, and the amount of the benefits you receive,  or the lump sum settlement you are offered. It could even affect your ability to obtain future employment in your chosen occupation.

Take care when seeing your doctor

What goes in your medical record can determine what types of medical care you receive and the duration of your treatment. Therefore, you should act appropriately when you visit your doctor. This is especially true if you are seeing a doctor who has been selected by the insurance company. In any case, your doctor will observe your behavior, note how you speak about your injury, and even examine the way you walk in and out of the doctor's office. If what the doctor sees conflicts in some way with the symptoms you claim to be experiencing, it could harm your claim.

Occupational hearing loss can cause permanent disability

Colorado workers in their various occupations are all exposed to the dangers inherent to their industries. Many of these hazards can cause injuries that could lead to permanent disability. Hearing loss is often overlooked because others cannot see the injury. However, it is a traumatic injury that could develop over time and be detrimental to the victim's quality of life. Millions of workers in different industries nationwide suffer occupational hearing loss every year.

Business owners who fail to provide the necessary protection and limit excessive noise levels may find that productivity and profits are adversely affected, while there might be additional losses in workers' compensation claims and lost time from work. Even infrequent high noise-level exposure can cause hearing damage. Excessive noise can destroy cochlear hair cells in the ear, and currently, no auxiliary or surgical options exist to repair this type of damage.

Workers' compensation and child support

You have suffered an injury while working and have filed a workers' compensation claim. When your claim is approved, will you get the full amount of the benefits to which you are entitled? That depends. Though in most cases, your benefits will not be subject to taxation, they could be reduced if you are in arrears for child support. This blog post will examine some aspects of this issue.

Workplace hazards faced by hotel housekeepers

Anyone who has stayed at a hotel has seen them: hotel housekeepers. Though it might appear that their work is not too hard, their days can be grueling and at times hazardous. In fact, according to one study hotel housekeepers are 40 percent more likely to suffer work injuries than other service sector workers. What are these hazards?

Tree worker fatally injured at work while cleaning up after storm

Utility workers and others who are involved in cleaning-up operations after storms in Colorado and elsewhere may not realize that they are putting their lives on the line. While flood waters can contain a brew of toxic chemicals and mold that could lead to long-term health problems, cutting damaged trees can be deadly -- particularly near power lines. This was precisely what led to an incident in another state in which a man was fatally injured at work.

Reportedly, a 31-year-old worker who was employed by a tree company was working on removing tree branches in order to restore electricity shortly before 4:30 a.m. on a recent Wednesday. Authorities say the power lines were damaged by a fallen tree. It is believed that the lines jumped upward when he lightened the load by cutting one section off the tree.

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Eley Law Firm
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