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Protecting the Rights of Injured Workers

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How dangerous are scaffolds?

Construction work doesn’t always involve building foundations or handling tasks at the ground level. Multi-floor projects in Colorado often involve workers standing on scaffolds and performing all kinds of duties. Working on scaffolding comes with risks, so people may benefit from being aware of typical injuries.

Scaffold dangers and injuries

The Center for Construction Research and Training raises attention to some shocking facts about scaffold dangers. Falls represent the most common cause of injuries and deaths to construction workers, with one-third of all falls involving scaffolds. The organization also notes that a large number of falls were preventable ones.

Properly trained employees might be less susceptible to making mistakes and suffering injuries. Management could institute training sessions to increase worker awareness about scaffold hazards and dangers.

Procuring a scaffold capable of holding the intended weight may reduce the chances of a catastrophe. Performing an inspection of constructed scaffolding might also improve safety. Of course, the person performing the inspection should possess the necessary qualifications to make accurate assessments.

Management could institute a “zero-tolerance” policy for horseplay and unsafe practices. Workers that present a danger to themselves or co-workers aren’t likely supporting a safe work environment.

Seeking compensation for lost wages and injuries

Employees injured at a construction site could file a workers’ compensation claim. Colorado remains a no-fault state, so negligence doesn’t factor into approving a claim.

A workers’ compensation claim might not be the only way an injured construction worker could receive financial assistance. Third-party lawsuits might be possible if, for example, the accident was caused by the negligence of the manufacturer of a defective scaffold.

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